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Arizona’s Republican governor has signed legislation preventing state health officials from ever adding a COVID-19 vaccine to the list of required school inoculations and barring mask mandates in government buildings. The bills Gov. Doug Ducey signed Friday permanently block disease mitigation measures that many health professionals say are critical to reining in the pandemic if case counts again surge or the virus mutates and becomes more deadly to children. GOP lawmakers say they are needed to stop government overreach and intrusion into personal choice. Minority Democrats were united in opposition.

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Legislation proposed by Florida lawmakers for an upcoming special session to reform the state’s property insurance market would create a $2 billion reinsurance fund for insurers to get insurance that insulates them from risk. Four bills filed late Friday in the state House and Senate would also allow homeowners with roofs 15 years or older to get an inspection of their condition before insurers deny them coverage. If an inspection shows that a roof has at least five years of life remaining, insurers can’t refuse to issue a policy only based on the roof’s age under the proposed legislation.

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Police in Kentucky say a deputy with the U.S. Marshals Service fatally shot a man whom the deputy was trying to serve an arrest warrant. The Louisville Metro Police Department said on social media Saturday that the shooting occurred Friday morning after an altercation with the man ensued. The Jefferson County Coroner's Office identified the person who was fatally shot as 25-year-old Omari Cryer. Authorities have not released additional details about the shooting. Louisville police's Public Integrity Unit is investigating the shooting at the request of the U.S. Marshals Service.

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The Kravis wedding train has rolled into Italy. According to reports, Kourtney Kardashian and Blink-182 drummer Travis Barker hit Portofino for a long wedding weekend. The couple and her entire reality TV family stepped out for dinner Friday night clad in Dolce & Gabbana after the two were snapped smooching on a boat that day. The group took to the streets of Portofino again Saturday on their way to lunch. This after a Las Vegas practice ceremony last month with an Elvis impersonator officiating, followed by a small ceremony May 15 in Santa Barbara, California. Portofino is a jet set favorite, a fishing village on the Ligurian coast.

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Three cadets at the U.S. Air Force Academy who have refused the COVID-19 vaccine will not be commissioned as military officers but will graduate with bachelor’s degrees, the academy said Saturday. Academy spokesman Dean Miller said that a fourth cadet who had refused the vaccine until about a week ago, decided to be vaccinated and will graduate and become an Air Force officer. Miller said in a statement that the three won't be commissioned into the United States Air Force as long as they remain unvaccinated. He says a decision on whether the unvaccinated students will be required to reimburse the United States for education costs in lieu of service will be made by the secretary of the Air Force.

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Police say one person was killed and eight people were wounded following a shooting at a large party in Southern California. San Bernardino police said Saturday that officers dispatched late Friday found the one person who was killed outside the party that was at a business in a strip mall in the city, east of Los Angeles. Eight others were wounded and taken to area hospitals. Police say the injuries did not appear to be life-threatening.Police say no arrests have been made.

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Police say a second person died in a rare tornado that hit a small community in northern Michigan. Lt. Derrick Carroll says the person was in their 70s and lived in a mobile home park in Gaylord. No other details have been released. Another person in their 70s who also lived at the park was reported to have died Friday evening, just a few hours after the tornado struck. More than 40 people were injured. Gaylord is roughly 230 miles northwest of Detroit. The Otsego County fire chief says there's “probably 95% destruction” at the park, with mobile homes “picked up and turned over.” Experts say extreme spring winds are uncommon in the area because the Great Lakes typically suck energy out of storms.

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Concern is mounting over the fate of Ukrainian fighters in Mariupol who have become Moscow’s prisoners as Russia claimed seizure of the port city's steel plant. The Russian Defense Ministry claimed to be taking Ukrainian soldiers into custody after announcing that its forces had removed the last holdouts from the plant’s miles of underground tunnels, capping a nearly three-month siege that left more than 20,000 Mariupol residents feared dead. The plant's seizure delivers Russian President Vladimir Putin a badly wanted victory in the war he began in February. A separatist leader in eastern Ukraine said they were sure to face a tribunal for their wartime actions.

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Chicago Public Schools says the personal information of more than a half-million district students and staff was compromised in a ransomware attack on a district vendor last December. CPS said Friday the data breach occurred Dec. 1, but CPS was not notified by technology vendor Battelle for Kids until April 26 that a server used to store student and staff information had been breached and four years’ worth of records were accessed. CPS says that in total, 495,448 student and 56,138 employee records were accessed from the 2015-16 through 2018-2019 school years. CPS says the breached server included names and identification numbers but did not include Social Security numbers, financial information or standardized test scores.

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Tennessee is about to become the first U.S. state to make it a felony to camp on local public property such as parks. It is already a felony in Tennessee to camp on most state-owned property. The crime is punishable by up to six years in prison and the loss of voting rights. Supporters say the law is needed to get some people to move off the streets. Critics say it is cruel and will make homelessness worse. Many landlords won't rent to felons and many employers won't hire them.

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Improved weather conditions are helping firefighters battling several large wildfires in New Mexico, including the largest active one in the nation. High winds challenged crews on Friday but officials said Saturday that a cold front lowered temperatures, raised humidity levels and provided cloud cover that helped slow spread of the fire. Over 2,700 firefighters and other personnel were assigned to the 6-week-old fire, which has burned 482 square miles. It's so big that it has been split into three zones each managed by its own command team. The fire is contained around 40% of its perimeter and is among five active large fires in the state and 16 nationally.

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A 30-year-old man collapsed and later died after crossing the finish line of a half-marathon in Brooklyn on Saturday morning. A statement from the nonprofit New York Road Runners confirmed the man was a participant in the 2022 RBC Brooklyn Half and collapsed after finishing the race. A New York City fire department spokesperson says the runner was taken to a nearby hospital and later pronounced dead. It was unclear what caused the man to collapse. A heat advisory was in effect for New York City until 8 p.m. Saturday. The nonprofit says temperatures ranged from the low 60s to high 70s during the race, which began at 7 a.m.

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Two Republican frontrunners are hoping to clinch primary victories in Georgia. Candidates in the state are making their final pitches to Georgia voters ahead of Tuesday’s election. Gov. Brian Kemp and former football star Herschel Walker hope to win GOP majorities and clinch nominations for governor and U.S. senator on Tuesday without runoffs. Kemp spoke to voters at a rally with Nebraska Gov. Pete Ricketts showing up to support him. Walker was scheduled to rally later Saturday in Columbus. For Kemp, an outright win would be vindication after months of attacks from former President Donald Trump.

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Wisconsin Republicans have agreed to have a “no endorsement” option when voting on whether to throw the party’s official backing behind a candidate in the hotly contested governor’s race. The top candidates in the governor’s race are slated to make their pitch for an endorsement to more than 1,500 delegates attending the annual convention Saturday near Madison. But first, under pressure from those who argued the party shouldn’t back any candidate before the Aug. 9 primary, delegates voted to have an option of not endorsing. Winning the endorsement requires support from 60% of delegates. The party’s endorsement unlocks funding from the state party, which can spend as much as it wants on the winner.

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The top U.S. military officer is challenging the next generation of Army soldiers to prepare America’s military to fight future wars that may look little like the wars of today. Army Gen. Mark Milley is chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff and his remarks were to graduating cadets at the U.S. Military Academy at West Point. His address paints a grim picture of a world that is becoming more unstable, with great powers intent on changing the global order. And he tells the cadets they will bear the responsibility to make sure America is ready.

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U.S. President Joe Biden and South Korean President Yoon Suk Yeol say after meeting that they will consider expanded joint military exercises to deter the nuclear threat from North Korea. The announcement Saturday during Biden's visit to Seoul reflects a shift in direction from former U.S. President Donald Trump. Trump had considered scrapping the exercises and had expressed affection for North Korean leader Kim Jong Un. The announcement may also put to rest concerns in Seoul that Washington would revert to the Obama administration's policy of “strategic patience” in which it largely looked the other way while North Korea expanded its nuclear arsenal.

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A partial skull from nearly 8,000 years ago that was found by two kayakers in a river last summer will be returned to Native American officials in Minnesota. Renville County Sheriff Scott Hable said the bone was found after a drought lowered the Minnesota River near the city of Sacred Heart, about 110 miles west of Minneapolis. A forensic anthropologist with the FBI determined the skull likely was from a young man who lived between 5500 and 6000 B.C. Hable posted about the discovery on the department's Facebook page on Wednesday, but removed the post after Native American officials said publishing photos of the skull was offensive to their culture.

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A 32-year-old woman who was the youngest of the 10 Black people killed at a Buffalo supermarket was remembered at her funeral for her love of family and friends and “smile that could light up a room.” Mourners said their final goodbyes to Roberta Drury on Saturday at the Assumption Church in Syracuse, not far from where she grew up in Cicero. Drury moved to Buffalo a decade ago to help tend to her brother in his fight against leukemia. She was shot to death last Saturday on a trip to buy groceries at the supermarket targeted by the white gunman.

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Australia’s Prime Minister-elect Anthony Albanese is a politician molded by his humble start to life as the only child of a single mother who raised him on a pension in gritty inner-Sydney suburbia. He is also a hero of multicultural Australia, describing himself as the only candidate with a “non-Anglo Celtic name” to run for prime minister in the 121 years that the office has existed. He has promised to rehabilitate Australia’s international reputation as a climate change laggard with steeper cuts to greenhouse gas emissions. His financially precarious upbringing in government-owned housing in suburban Camperdown fundamentally formed the politician who has lead the center-left Australian Labor Party into government for the first time since 2007.

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Scott Morrison says his conservative government had left Australia in a robust condition even as voters punished him for his handling of issues including climate change and the pandemic that helped return the center-left opposition to power. Morrison says he'll step down as head of the Liberal party after conceding defeat to the Labor party and its leader Anthony Albanese. A former tourism marketer before switching to politics, Morrison was labeled the “accidental prime minister” in 2018, and sprung a major surprise by winning a 2019 election. He has since been deeply criticized for dragging the chain on climate change and for not establishing a promised integrity and corruption watchdog. He was also scorned for his handling of sexual harassment scandals.

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Australia’s center-left opposition party has toppled the conservative government after almost a decade in power. Prime Minister-elect Anthony Albanese in his Saturday election victory speech promised sharper reductions in greenhouse gas emissions while he faces an early foreign policy test. Prime Minister Scott Morrison said he quickly conceded defeat despite millions of votes yet to be counted because an Australian leader must attend a Tokyo summit on Tuesday with U.S. President Joe Biden and leaders from Japan and India. Albanese has described himself as the only candidate with a “non-Anglo Celtic name” to run for prime minister in the 121 years that the office has existed. He referred to his own humble upbringing in the Sydney suburb of Camperdown.

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The former director of the Ohio state prison system has emerged as a leading contender to run the crisis-plagued federal Bureau of Prisons. That's according to three people familiar with the matter who spoke to The Associated Press. The people say Gary Mohr is among the top contenders to replace Bureau of Prisons Director Michael Carvajal. Carvajal submitted his resignation in January but said he would stay on until a successor was named. The people cautioned a final decision has not been made. Mohr said Saturday he was “shocked to see an article" describing him as a contender for the position and denied he had applied or been interviewed.

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The White House is planning for what it calls “dire” contingencies that could include rationing supplies of vaccines and treatments this fall if Congress doesn’t approve more money for fighting COVID-19. Biden administration officials have been warning for weeks that the country has spent nearly all the money approved for COVID-19 response. The administration faces critical decisions about how to spend what's left. It's weighing whether to use it to secure the next generation of vaccines to protect the highest risk populations or to prioritize highly effective therapies to reduce the risks of severe illness and death. Rationing could expose even the most vulnerable to shortages.

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